Top 10 Fascinating But Boiling Truths About Face Recognition

The origins of face recognition technology are in the 1960s. Of course, the capacity to execute it on a massive scale and pervasively didn’t emerge until the modern era of computers. Now it appears to be practically everywhere, and there are concerns that it will become much more commonplace in the future. Unfortunately, most of us don’t know the whole scope of current technological applications, let alone their advantages and disadvantages.

Cats Can Now Use Facial Recognition

Is it worthwhile to invest in technology if it can’t improve the lives of animals? Fortunately, facial recognition works here, as this technology was developed with the goal of finding owners for lost pets.

As you may anticipate, the idea is really straightforward. You can post pictures of your missing pet on an app. Having the photos saved in the database will allow for easy matching of animals using facial recognition technology in the event that someone comes across your beloved pet.

There are other applications as well. There is a feeder for cats that uses face recognition technology to track how much food they eat. For example, it may sound an alarm if one of your cats isn’t getting enough food, or it may cut off the food supply when it detects that the same hungry boy is returning for more.

Facial recognition software that could only match photos to photos cost the FBI $1 billion.

Of course, law enforcement has an interest in facial recognition systems. While there is much to debate regarding the technology’s potential dangers, privacy invasions, and other ills, there is also something more fundamental to consider: how effectively it functions.

At this current moment, the technology has unquestionably advanced, and there are instances where it has performed exceptionally effectively. Looking back to when the FBI initially invested in it, though, things become a bit more ugly. The Bureau invested over $1 billion on facial recognition technologies that required high-quality image matching in order to function properly.

The computer may find a matching image by comparing two high-quality, clear, front-facing photos of the same person. It may seem like something a person could do, and you could be right. The speed may be the sole benefit of using a computer for this task.

In the absence of a second, high-quality image stored in the computer, there can be no comparison. This was found in Boston following the 2013 bombing of the Boston Marathon.

Facial recognition software was unable to match the two suspects despite the FBI having access to images of them and video of them; this was due to the low quality of the surveillance footage, which rendered the software ineffective.

The program, which cost one billion dollars, could only match “driver’s license and passport photos to other driver’s license and passport photos,” according to an employee of the FBI.

Even though the FBI had images of the two suspects and video of them, the low quality of the security material rendered the facial recognition software worthless in matching them. The program, which cost one billion dollars, could only match “driver’s license and passport photos to other driver’s license and passport photos,” according to an employee of the FBI.

Some Facial Recognition Technologies Cannot Recognize Juggalo Makeup

If you’re interested in fooling face recognition systems for legitimate and good reasons, you might want to consider becoming a fan of the Insane Clown Posse. Facial recognition software has struggled to decipher the band’s and their followers’ (often more colorfully referred to as “Juggalos”) elaborate makeup.

Many of the methods by which facial recognition distinguishes between faces in order to identify them depend on contrast. To achieve its signature monochrome clown look, juggalo makeup consists of a white base adorned with black bands and various forms. Facial recognition is unable to discern its target due to the artificially high contrast it generates.

This discovery was made public when LiveNation and Ticketmaster acquired facial recognition technology from the military to be used at concert admission points. Some types of makeup, like juggalo makeup, which features stark black and white contrasts around the lips and chin, might fool facial recognition systems into thinking your jawline isn’t there.

There are other types of technology that don’t rely on contrast, so Juggalo makeup wouldn’t work. But at least you’d be showing your support for the Insane Clown Posse anyhow.

The Face Recognition System Depends on the Eyebrows

Having well-groomed eyebrows is important to some people. For some, it’s perfectly OK to have fuzzy caterpillars covering their eyes. The eyebrows play a crucial role in face recognition. If you compare eyebrows to other facial features—like eyes, noses, lips, and general face shape—you would think they don’t matter much for face recognition.

In terms of biology, eyebrows play a key role in facial recognition. A person looking at you will notice hair, which is absent from the majority of people’s faces, because it stands out. Crowds help us understand each other’s faces even when we’re face-to-face. That software also considers this is logical.

While software hasn’t traditionally relied on eyebrows as a primary identifier, researchers had to make adjustments during the COVID-19 epidemic to account for the widespread usage of masks, which rendered other facial features—such as mouths, jawlines, and noses—ineffective.

You can’t overlook the significance of eyebrows, which, according to some research, are just as important as lip thickness, eye color and shape, and eyebrow thickness when it comes to recognizing a face.

At her concerts, Taylor Swift used facial recognition technology to detect and deter stalkers.

Facial recognition isn’t just for Juggalos; we seen it at a concert before. One of the most famous musicians working today, Taylopr Swift, has been utilizing it to find anyone who might be stalking her.

Before Swift’s 2018 Rose Bowl performance, she had kiosks put up outside the stadium. Kiosks displayed videos of her dance routines while covertly scanning attendees’ faces as they poured in. All of the faces were compared using facial recognition technology to a database of known stalkers she has dealt with before, allowing the security team to be prepared.

At NASCAR races, malls, and athletic events, the identical technology is employed for a wide range of vague goals, such as security and advertising. If you have attended a public event in the past several years, it is highly probable that an unknown company has your name, photo, and preferences recorded. As of 2019, the business had amassed information on 110 million eventgoers.

The business maintains that it does not store any personally identifiable information and denies ever taking pictures of anyone. Seems like a reasonable idea.

A coffee vending machine at an airport utilised facial recognition technology to serve customers who yawned.

Efforts to get people to adopt face recognition have been successful, even if most people are first wary of it. The South African coffee business Douwe Egberts accomplished all that was necessary: it gave people a cause to.

Despite installing a coffee vending machine at a heavily trafficked airport, the company was unable to cover the cost of the coffee. Nevertheless, the machine’s cameras detected when users yawned and provided them with complimentary coffee. Everyone who desired free coffee could obtain it after they figured out what activated the machine.

Narratives highlight the delight and amusement felt by all participants upon realizing the situation was a marketing ploy, as it certainly was. Not as widely publicized was the fact that the technology was training individuals to respond in a specific way—a move that paid huge dividends for the business and demonstrated their ability to employ face recognition in marketing efforts to influence consumer behavior.

4 Some hairdos deceive facial recognition systems.

Makeup may fool facial recognition systems, but it’s far from the only cosmetic option that might fool these programs. Some hairdos, like CV Dazzle, have also caused confusion in the past.

Adam Harvey developed the method as part of his Master’s thesis; it demonstrated that a person may evade the most popular facial recognition software algorithm of the time by strategically combining their hairdo, cosmetics, and clothing.

Even if you were to look at these designs and thought they were intentionally trying to fool facial recognition software, you probably wouldn’t. But in reality, they would merely appear to be returning from Fashion Week.

Even if you were to look at these designs and think they were intentionally meant to fool facial recognition software, you probably wouldn’t. But in reality, they would merely appear to be returning from Fashion Week.

Similarly to how Juggalo makeup could fool the software, this was a sexier (or at least less garish) approach that could involve hair covering a portion of the face (often one eye) or otherwise changing the apparent elliptical shape of the face and head.

China Implements Facial Recognition System to Combat Theft of Toilet Paper

The Temple of Heaven in Beijing, a revered landmark and popular tourist destination, is leading the way in innovative face recognition applications. The Temple installed facial recognition toilet paper dispensers in 2017 for the convenience of its visitors.

A roll of paper is dispensed once the system scans your face. And why is that? The restrooms were becoming a target for the theft of toilet paper. Now it delivers you a two-foot-long piece of paper—what it believes you need—and if you return for more, it will remember your face and keep giving you the stuff.

A roll of paper is dispensed once the system scans your face. And why is that? The restrooms were becoming a target for the theft of toilet paper. Now it delivers you a two-foot-long piece of paper—what it believes you need—and if you return for more, it will remember your face and keep giving you the stuff.

So, what should you do if you honestly require additional paper? You best figure out how to make do with just two feet, since that’s a shame. Assuming you’re willing to put in the necessary effort, there is a cumbersome workaround. In order to acquire a second length, you need to wait the nine minutes because the machines are on timers. Anyone who requires it will find it inconvenient, but would-be thieves will find it far more so.

Sales Venues Collect Customers’ Biometric Information Through Facial Recognition

Since this is more common than you would think—and since we brought it up previously while discussing Taylor Swift—let’s take a closer look at malls. You know, those directory kiosks at malls that allow you search up store names and locations on a map? If there’s one in your mall, it’s likely that it’s also secretly using facial recognition software while keeping a camera on you and everyone else who walks by.

In 2018, a couple of Canadian malls faced consequences for this practice, as customers were not notified about the photography or its purpose. After two years of research, it was found that the mall’s owner had utilized the same technology in twelve other malls across the nation to capture the likenesses of five million customers.

The business insists it was merely keeping tabs on foot movement and not collecting any personally identifiable information from consumers other than their gender and age for statistical purposes. But it also recorded audio and video, which officials said was for testing purposes only.

While the mall claims they told customers about the cameras’ “safety and security” purposes, the privacy commissions that looked into the matter didn’t believe that mattered because the cameras themselves were collecting biometric data to estimate people’s ages, genders, and buying histories.

Sunglasses with Facial Recognition Technology Used by Chinese Police

Police officers in China used sunglasses equipped with face recognition technology in 2018, a move straight out of science fiction or a flop like Google Glass. The frames include a camera that can scan groups of people and compare their faces to a database using the same basic technology that unlocks your phone. A police officer can be immediately alerted by the glasses if a picture of a wanted criminal, someone using a false identity, or someone similar is on file.

The technology was reportedly so effective that it helped Chinese police apprehend over six suspects while they casually strolled through crowded train stations, according to sources within the country’s police force.

Some have speculated that the technology may be used to profile individuals or even identify political dissidents, but no government or police force would ever do anything like that.

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